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Author: nappar

Everything-Voluntary.com teams up with NAP Parenting!

Everything-Voluntary.com teams up with NAP Parenting!

Thanks and a big shout out to Skyler Collins and the kind folks at everything-voluntary.com! (See our page here) Voluntaryism is just another name for the NAP as far as we’re concerned, so this community of like-minded writers is a perfect fit for our message and what we stand for. Go check it out!

My Stint at a “Democratic” School – A Horror Story

My Stint at a “Democratic” School – A Horror Story

I had been a teacher for five years, and I was weary of the coercion inherent within the public school system. If a student didn’t want to learn, I tried to find engaging methods to draw him in. At first it was exciting. As a student teacher, I had designed lessons around a 6th grader in a hypothetical science class who only wanted to draw dragons. I suggested assignments on the history of dragons, the chemistry of breathing fire, the…

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Giving (Reasonable) Choices

Giving (Reasonable) Choices

Here’s a tip that most parenting books and experts recommend, but which is often perverted, like anything, when not grounded in an ethical framework. The idea is to give children choices, which allows them to enjoy some autonomy. For example, when a child is avoiding bedtime, instead of making demands or punishing, we say “How many more minutes would you like?” or, if it’s time to eat, we ask, “What part of the meal would you like to start with,…

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Fines and Fees in a Voluntary System?

Fines and Fees in a Voluntary System?

Sometimes an agreement just can’t be made. You’ve insisted that the child refold the stack of laundry that she pulled down into a pile, and she’s just not going to do it. In fact, she’s already run out to play, and you either step over the mess in the hallway, or clean up after her. You might be thinking “So, the logical consequence is what? Take her clothes away? Take her bed away since she doesn’t respect the sheets? That’s…

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Stealing Wallets (Spanking); A Common Conversation

Stealing Wallets (Spanking); A Common Conversation

What does it mean to follow the NAP? Simple! Just don’t aggress against people or their property. Oh great! I already do that, most of the time. Oh? What about the other times?  Well, I’ll admit, sometimes I steal people’s wallets in dark alleys (spank my kid). But you know, I try to follow it in general. Oh, well, you’re failing. You’re not following it. Well I am actually. Day in and day out, I’m very well behaved. But sometimes,…

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Trick-Or-Treating the NAP Parenting Way

Trick-Or-Treating the NAP Parenting Way

Here we’ll share how we use three important tools of NAP Parenting: negotiation, the idea of strict property rights, and contracts, to make sure that trick-or-treating is not a one-way ticket to the dentist. There are other concerns around the holiday, like safety, but we’ll just talk about candy here. If you’ve never done things like this in your home, our approach may sound complicated, and maybe a bit cold. Cold because we would all prefer being able to share…

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A Survey of Grown Unschoolers

A Survey of Grown Unschoolers


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Work from Peter Gray, a prominent researcher of homeschooling and un-schooling.

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The Tuttle Twins Learn About The Law – Connor Boyack

The Tuttle Twins Learn About The Law – Connor Boyack

“Life, liberty, and property do not exist because men have made laws. On the contrary, it was the fact that life, liberty, and property existed beforehand that caused men to make laws in the first place.” – Frédéric Bastiat This review focuses on our favorite of the Tuttle Twins series, The Law, based on Frédéric Bastiat’s work by the same name from 1850. The other titles in the series are also recommended, but are not as closely aligned with the…

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Punishment: What Is It? And Why Is It A Dirty Word?

Punishment: What Is It? And Why Is It A Dirty Word?

Students of psychology, specifically operant conditioning (think B.F. Skinner), understand that punishment is a stimulus, or aversive event, that occurs after a behavior and that reduces the likelihood of that behavior occurring again in the future. In short, punishment weakens or decreases a behavior. “Positive” punishments are the introduction of a negative stimulus to decrease behavior. Hitting a child would be an example of “positive” punishment, because pain is introduced in hopes that their behavior will decrease. “Negative” punishments, or…

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